Dress Code

DRESS CODE FOR STUDENTS

The aim of the dress code policy at Bi-Cultural Day School is to create an atmosphere of dignity, modesty and respect based on the principles of Jewish law, and to promote an atmosphere for learning for our students. Proper student attire at our school fosters self-respect, self-confidence and seriousness of academic purpose. We are taught that our clothing not only reflects but also influences who we are. When we ask our students to dress modestly and maintain a neat appearance, we encourage them to respect their bodies, respect themselves and be sensitive to others. When we ask our students to dress with a degree of formality, we encourage them to respect their school as a place of learning. When we permit our students, within some guidelines, to choose their own clothing, they are able to express themselves creatively. To these ends, we urge you to be sure your child is dressed appropriately each morning. The school sets the policy; it is essential that parents and all teachers help implement it.

Policies:

  • Students must adhere to school dress code policies provided below.
  • If an infraction occurs, the matter will be addressed as a disciplinary issue.
  • Please help ensure your child is properly dressed before school.

ENFORCEMENT OF THESE POLICIES WILL BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY BY ADMINISTRATION AND TEACHERS.

If a student violates the dress code, the student will be required to adhere to dress code parameters prior to returning to class. The main office will supply dress code appropriate attire for the remainder of the day.

BCDS Dress Code

Dress Code Standards for Grades PreK- 3

Primary students should dress in comfortable, safe and durable attire. T-shirts are permitted for boys and girls in these grades but must not display slogans, advertisements or inappropriate symbols. Small manufacturer logos are permitted and decorative prints for girls are acceptable. Boys are required to wear a kippah at all times.

Dress Code Standards for Grades 4 – 8

BOYS:

Shirts: Short or long sleeve polo or oxford shirt in white, light blue or navy blue (solid color)

Pants: Plain front or pleated “khaki style” pants in khaki, navy blue or black (solid color). Jeans, Cargo and Painters Paints are not permitted.

Kippah: Boys are required to wear a kippah at all times.

GIRLS:

Shirts: Short or long sleeve polo or oxford shirt in white, light blue or navy blue (solid color)

Skirts: BELOW THE KNEE in khaki, navy blue or black (solid color). Denim is not permitted.

Logos and Verbiage on Clothing: Small manufacturer logos are acceptable, but should be no bigger than a half dollar. (Example: Polo, Izod, Under Armour…) Designs, words, symbols or appliques are not acceptable on any article of clothing.

Sweaters and Sweatshirts: White, light blue, navy or black sweaters and sweatshirts may be worn over a shirt that meets the dress code requirements. Sweaters and sweatshirts must be solid color.

BAR AND BAT MITZVAH SWEATSHIRTS: Bar and Bat Mitzvah sweatshirts may be worn in school on MONDAYS only. Dress code attire is required underneath.

SAFETY NOTE:

SNEAKERS ARE REQUIRED FOOTWEAR ON PHYSICAL EDUCATION DAYS.

FLIP FLOPS ARE A SAFETY HAZARD AND ARE NOT PERMISSABLE FOOTWEAR AT SCHOOL FOR ANY STUDENT.

“DRESS DOWN DAYS”:

Parents are expected assist children in making appropriate choices:

  • NO T-shirts with inappropriate graphics.
  • NO tank tops or revealing apparel.
  • NO yoga pants.
  • NO leggings or tight clothing.
  • Knee length shorts only.

“8th GRADE THEME DAYS”: The last Friday of each month is designated for Grade 8 theme days. Students are required to remain in dress code attire underneath the theme shirt, hat or accessories. Theme days must be approved by the administration.

Piercing: It is Bi-Cultural Day School policy that other than piercing to a female’s ears, all other noticeable piercing of the body is prohibited. Additionally, tattoos or other marks made on the body are prohibited. As stated earlier in this handbook, these rules are based upon the modesty, respect, and dignity accorded the human body by Jewish law (halacha) deriving from the belief that all men and women are created B’tzelem Elokim, “in the image of G-d.”